May 16, 2020

No place for technology barriers as focus turns to customer experience

Technology
Supply Chain
Customer Experience
Tim Rushent
4 min
South Korea has the highest ratio of robots to employees in the world
As consumers get ever more technologically savvy and aware of their buying choices, the customer experience is being driven up the corporate agenda, and...

As consumers get ever more technologically savvy and aware of their buying choices, the customer experience is being driven up the corporate agenda, and along the supply chain. Recognising that consumers are monitoring, evaluating and sharing their experiences, manufacturers need to build feedback and agility into their business strategy in order to benefit from this revolution, rather than losing out to it.

The power that consumers now wield has been fuelled by the rise of social media and the opportunity to share reviews and recommendations and, as a result, their buying choices. This transformation has done little to restore trust in institutions, governments and business.

In response, retailers and service providers are actively working to build closer connections with their customers. While some manufacturers may conclude that end-customers are too far away in the chain, this is likely to prove a high-risk strategy. They cannot sit back and allow retailers sole responsibility for promoting their products: manufacturers must seize control of the customer experience and make it a key competitive differentiator.

However, only connected organisations can deliver great customer experience. This is especially true for manufacturers, who must maintain connectivity not just between factory floor, research departments and leadership; but also up and down their supply chains.

One key area for building brand loyalty is adapting to feedback, and using it to provide a highly personalised experience for the customer. Ultimately, manufacturers can also use feedback as a way of constantly upgrading and improving their products in a seamless way that is endorsed by the client base. This level of customer engagement is a game-changer, which is set to transform the approach, culture and ecosystem of all businesses.

Nevertheless, many leaders who already recognise this reality - and should be gaining valuable first-mover advantage - are seeing their organisations fall short in the absence of a suitable ecosystem that delivers such outcomes. One of the barriers is often technological: manufacturers face particular difficulties in their interactions with customers.

For example, a customer may call the manufacturer with a warranty issue, and yet because the company has had no previous contact with that persona, they therefore hold no data. To address this challenge, firms must implement a system that allows employees across the organisation to view and act upon service-relevant information. Naturally, manufacturers who build suitably proactive and reactive feedback systems will also want to include their direct clients in the process, and ensure that direct buyers feel as well looked after as the consumer.

While most companies will have long-established systems to deal with the arrival of each new customer engagement channel, the good news is that bringing these together may not be insurmountable, from either a cost or implementation perspective. One option is to put in place a single enterprise information platform, which brings all front-line systems together, offering connectivity to any legacy ‘back office’ systems that staff may still be using.

This hub can effectively link the customer directly to advanced R&D functions, manufacturing software and the company leadership: then all of these key departments will be able to see feedback and analysis of customer data, almost as fast as it comes in. Such a platform can hold an organisation together like glue, but it will only really be effective in terms of customer experience if the internal user experience is equally good.

It is widely recognised that employee satisfaction goes hand-in-hand with service quality. However, to achieve such outcomes, the process for finding and using data needs to be easy and intuitive. A connected business needs to think of its staff much as it does its customers, ensuring a seamless experience, by providing suitable training and an easy to use interface that will facilitate all their work. This approach should extend beyond the technology and into the culture of the organisation - indeed as has been previously suggested, the very concept of ’back office’ should be consigned to history.

From a management perspective, to maximise the return on the investment, executives should define and communicate the customer experience strategy, ahead of any new software selection and implementation. As a starting point, this should be a detailed vision of what you want your customers to feel and experience, and how you can leverage that into growth.

Once the organisation has aligned and integrated all systems, geographies and platforms, greater opportunities for monetising the customer experience will emerge, with emergent technologies based on AI, bots and analytics set to play a greater role. Manufacturers that are able to constantly improve their offer both to wholesale and retail customers will not only gain sales, but also create valuable efficiencies. At the same time, they will build trust and loyalty that bonds them to the client base and ensures successful peer-to-peer reputations for years to come.

Tim Rushent is account manager, industry and commerce, with Hyland. www.hyland.com

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Jun 17, 2021

Siemens: Providing the First Industrial 5G Router

Siemens
5G
IIoT
Data
3 min
Siemens’ first industrial 5G router, the Scalancer MUM856-1, is now available and will revolutionise the concept of remote control in industry

Across a number of industry sectors, there’s a growing need for both local wireless connectivity and remote access to machines and plants. In both of these cases, communication is, more often than not, over a long distance. Public wireless data networks can be used to enable this connectivity, both nationally and internationally, which makes the new 5G network mainframe an absolutely vital element of remote access and remote servicing solutions as we move into the interconnected age. 

 

Siemens Enables 5G IIoT

The eagerly awaited Scalance MUM856-1, Siemens’ very first industrial 5G router, is officially available to organisations. The device has the ability to connect all local industrial applications to the public 5G, 4G (LTE), and 3G (UMTS) mobile wireless networks ─ allowing companies to embrace the long-awaited Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). 

Siemens presents its first industrial 5G router.
Siemens presents the Scalance MUM856-1.

The router can be used to remotely monitor and service plants, machines, as well as control elements and other industrial devices via a public 5G network ─ flexibly and with high data rates. Something that has been in incredibly high demand after being teased by the leading network providers for years.

 

Scalance MUM856-1 at a Glance

 

  • Scalance MUM856-1 connects local industrial applications to public 5G, 4G, and 3G mobile wireless networks
  • The router supports future-oriented applications such as remote access via public 5G networks or the connection of mobile devices such as automated guided vehicles in industry
  • A robust version in IP65 housing for use outside the control cabinet
  • Prototypes of Siemens 5G infrastructure for private networks already in use at several sites

 

5G Now

“To ensure the powerful connection of Ethernet-based subnetworks and automation devices, the Scalance MUM856-1 supports Release 15 of the 5G standard. The device offers high bandwidths of up to 1000 Mbps for the downlink and up to 500 Mbps for the uplink – providing high data rates for data-intensive applications such as the remote implementation of firmware updates. Thanks to IPv6 support, the devices can also be implemented in modern communication networks.

 

Various security functions are included to monitor data traffic and protect against unauthorised access: for example, an integrated firewall and authentication of communication devices and encryption of data transmission via VPN. If there is no available 5G network, the device switches automatically to 4G or 3G networks. The first release version of the router has an EU radio license; other versions with different licenses are in preparation. With the Sinema Remote Connect management platform for VPN connections, users can access remote plants or machines easily and securely – even if they are integrated in other networks. The software also offers easy management and autoconfiguration of the devices,” Siemens said. 

 

Preparing for a 5G-oriented Future

Siemens has announced that the new router can also be integrated into private 5G networks. This means that the Scalance MUM856-1 is, essentially, future-proofed when it comes to 5G adaptability; it supports future-oriented applications, including ‘mobile robots in manufacturing, autonomous vehicles in logistics or augmented reality applications for service technicians.’ 

 

And, for use on sites where conditions are a little harsher, Siemens has given the router robust IP65 housing ─ it’s “dust tight”, waterproof, and immersion-proofed.

 

The first release version of the router has an EU radio license; other versions with different licenses are in preparation. “With the Sinema Remote Connect management platform for VPN connections, users can access remote plants or machines easily and securely – even if they are integrated in other networks. The software also offers easy management and auto-configuration of the devices,” Siemens added.

 

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