Jun 22, 2020

COVID-19: HOW 3D printing is crucial to GM’s efforts

Georgia Wilson
3 min
General Motors COVID-19 medical supply production
Manufacturing Global discovers how 3D printing technology has been vital to General Motors’ efforts to combat COVID-19...

When it comes to 3D printing General Motors details that its typical use of the technology is to help launch new vehicles.

However in recent times, due to the impact of COVID-19, the technology has taken on a new role, playing a vital part in the companies efforts to transition its operations from making vehicles to medical devices. Due to the automotive manufacturers expertise in 3D printing (additive manufacturing) the company was able to quickly shift its core business to medical production.

“3D printing helps us design and build parts and products faster and in ways we previously couldn’t,” said Kevin Quinn, GM director of additive design and manufacturing. “It’s already having a positive impact on how we develop and build vehicles, like Corvette, and it’s allowed us to apply our mass production expertise to medical supplies and devices.”

“We could not have responded to the coronavirus as quickly as we did without 3D printing,” said Ron Daul, GM director of additive manufacturing. “The investment in both our additive manufacturing facilities and training the team to leverage 3D printing for development has enabled us to pivot to making ventilators and personal protective equipment virtually overnight.”

To produce its medical supplies, General Motors applied additive manufacturing to three core areas of its operations:

Manufacturing

When it comes to the tools required to assemble the ventilators produced by General Motors - with its partner Ventec Life Systems and Hamilton Medical - the company reports that all tools are 3D printed, with most being 3D printed ‘nests’ or fixtures that hold parts in place when being assembled.

“3D printing allows us to make constant, rapid changes to fixtures based on feedback from the assembly teams,” said Dominick Lentine, GM senior manufacturing engineer, additive applications. “We can receive feedback from Hamilton, improve a part and have it flown back to Reno in less than 24 hours.”

To further increase its response speed, General Motors’ Additive Innovation Lab nd Additive Industrialisation Center recently delivered and installed 3D printers in Kokomo allowing printing capabilities onsite.

Prototyping

Since 1989, General Motors has been using additive manufacturing for rapid prototyping. With its knowledge of 3D printing the company has been able to quickly build and assess different designs and assembly tools, as well as develop and produce face shields for first responders.

By having the capability to quickly deliver prototypes of face shields to local healthcare workers general motors was also able to rapidly make improvements based on feedback prior to producing supplies in large quantities.

Production

Following its prototyping of face shields, General Motors produced over 17,000 for local hospitals. Once perfected the final design was sent to be mass produced using injection molding, since going into full production the company has produced over 250,000 face shields.

Recently, General Motors has also been 3D printing ear savers to make wearing a protective mask more comfortable for the wearer. 3D printing helped General Motors define, refine and distribute a design before expanding its production.

To find out more about general motors efforts during the pandemic, click here!

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Image source: General Motors 

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Jun 17, 2021

Siemens: Providing the First Industrial 5G Router

Siemens
5G
IIoT
Data
3 min
Siemens’ first industrial 5G router, the Scalancer MUM856-1, is now available and will revolutionise the concept of remote control in industry

Across a number of industry sectors, there’s a growing need for both local wireless connectivity and remote access to machines and plants. In both of these cases, communication is, more often than not, over a long distance. Public wireless data networks can be used to enable this connectivity, both nationally and internationally, which makes the new 5G network mainframe an absolutely vital element of remote access and remote servicing solutions as we move into the interconnected age. 

 

Siemens Enables 5G IIoT

The eagerly awaited Scalance MUM856-1, Siemens’ very first industrial 5G router, is officially available to organisations. The device has the ability to connect all local industrial applications to the public 5G, 4G (LTE), and 3G (UMTS) mobile wireless networks ─ allowing companies to embrace the long-awaited Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). 

Siemens presents its first industrial 5G router.
Siemens presents the Scalance MUM856-1.

The router can be used to remotely monitor and service plants, machines, as well as control elements and other industrial devices via a public 5G network ─ flexibly and with high data rates. Something that has been in incredibly high demand after being teased by the leading network providers for years.

 

Scalance MUM856-1 at a Glance

 

  • Scalance MUM856-1 connects local industrial applications to public 5G, 4G, and 3G mobile wireless networks
  • The router supports future-oriented applications such as remote access via public 5G networks or the connection of mobile devices such as automated guided vehicles in industry
  • A robust version in IP65 housing for use outside the control cabinet
  • Prototypes of Siemens 5G infrastructure for private networks already in use at several sites

 

5G Now

“To ensure the powerful connection of Ethernet-based subnetworks and automation devices, the Scalance MUM856-1 supports Release 15 of the 5G standard. The device offers high bandwidths of up to 1000 Mbps for the downlink and up to 500 Mbps for the uplink – providing high data rates for data-intensive applications such as the remote implementation of firmware updates. Thanks to IPv6 support, the devices can also be implemented in modern communication networks.

 

Various security functions are included to monitor data traffic and protect against unauthorised access: for example, an integrated firewall and authentication of communication devices and encryption of data transmission via VPN. If there is no available 5G network, the device switches automatically to 4G or 3G networks. The first release version of the router has an EU radio license; other versions with different licenses are in preparation. With the Sinema Remote Connect management platform for VPN connections, users can access remote plants or machines easily and securely – even if they are integrated in other networks. The software also offers easy management and autoconfiguration of the devices,” Siemens said. 

 

Preparing for a 5G-oriented Future

Siemens has announced that the new router can also be integrated into private 5G networks. This means that the Scalance MUM856-1 is, essentially, future-proofed when it comes to 5G adaptability; it supports future-oriented applications, including ‘mobile robots in manufacturing, autonomous vehicles in logistics or augmented reality applications for service technicians.’ 

 

And, for use on sites where conditions are a little harsher, Siemens has given the router robust IP65 housing ─ it’s “dust tight”, waterproof, and immersion-proofed.

 

The first release version of the router has an EU radio license; other versions with different licenses are in preparation. “With the Sinema Remote Connect management platform for VPN connections, users can access remote plants or machines easily and securely – even if they are integrated in other networks. The software also offers easy management and auto-configuration of the devices,” Siemens added.

 

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