May 16, 2020

Jaguar Land Rover director to head Faraday Battery Challenge

Jaguar Land Rover
Electric Vehicles Faraday Battery Challenge
Electric Vehicles
Jaguar Land Rover
Sophie Chapman
2 min
JLR Director to lead the £246mn Faraday Battery Challenge
Tony Harper, the Director of Engineering Research at Jaguar Land Rover, the automotive manufacturer, is to head the Faraday Battery Challenge.

The Fara...

Tony Harper, the Director of Engineering Research at Jaguar Land Rover, the automotive manufacturer, is to head the Faraday Battery Challenge.

The Faraday Challenge has been funded by the UK government, which supplied £246mn (US$340mn), in order to develop batteries for electric vehicles (EVs).

The aim of the initiative is to safe, cost-effective, durable, lighter weight, higher performing and recyclable batteries through the Industrial Strategy.

“This is a unique opportunity to maximise the advantage for the UK from the shift to the electrification of transport by creating a high-tech, high-value, high-skill industry in battery technology,” stated Tony Harper.

SEE ALSO:

Tony Harper is anticipated to begin his position as Director of the Faraday Battery Challenge on 9 April, when he joins the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

“With 200,000 electric vehicles set to be on UK roads by the end of 2018, investment in car batteries is a massive opportunity for Britain and one that, through our flagship Industrial Strategy and the Automotive Sector Deal, the government is committed to seizing,” commented Rcihard Harrington, the UK’s Business Minister.

“Tony’s long-standing experience and expertise in automotive research and development means he is the ideal candidate to lead the ground-breaking Faraday Battery Challenge,” said Ruth McKernan, CEO of Innovate UK.

“He will have an important role to play in ensuring the UK is a world leader in the development of automotive battery technologies.”

Share article

Jul 13, 2021

SAP Whitepaper: Advantages of Intelligent Assets

SAP
SmartManufacturing
IntelligentAssets
industry4.0
2 min
SAP Intelligent Assets
Discover what constitutes an Intelligent Asset, and how they reduce overheads and mitigate disruption in our whitepaper on SAP’s Industry 4.0 strategy

A core pillar in SAP’s Industry 4.0 strategy, Intelligent Assets equip organisations to reduce downtime, empower employees and increase efficiencies across industrial equipment and manufacturing units.  

In a whitepaper produced in partnership between SAP and BizClik Media Group, Rachel Romanoski, Solutions Manager, Digital Assets, SAP, dispels some of the myths surrounding asset intelligent, and shares insight into how even small investment in asset intelligence can pay dividends in minimising cost leakage and realising an asset’s potential. 

As with all innovations, the ceiling for Intelligent Assets is as high as an organisation can dream, afford and implement. But Romanoski says that just a little intelligence can go a long way: “Oftentimes people think Intelligent Assets need to be the latest and greatest cutting-edge technology. They can be super advanced, such as leveraging physics-based engineering simulations to forecast potential failures, and help mitigate them. But it could be as simple as a temperature reading. You can pull a lot of simple information from most equipment, and by enhancing that data through ancillary solutions and digital capabilities, you can create that Intelligent Asset.” 


One of the most immediate benefits is reducing or, in some cases, eliminating unplanned downtime. Equipment failure is one of the most common causes of disruption and can cause chaos throughout the supply chain. 

“The true power of the Intelligent Asset is in changing the basic, reactive emergency work or time-based, planned maintenance and being more prescriptive and tailored to that specific asset and use case,” Romanoski says. “Ultimately, you can reduce the unplanned events that often carry a big price tag.” 

"Oftentimes people think Intelligent Assets need to be the latest and greatest cutting-edge technology... But it could be as simple as a temperature reading"

Other financial benefits include stemming cost leakage and “sweating assets” to the full potential.  “Maybe you can consider the lifecycle of the asset and understand whether you can push it a little bit further,” Romanoski explains. “It might be that the best course of action for a low-cost item is to run it to failure. Having this information that we collect over time empowers those people to make those better decisions, but also has a trickle down effect to building resiliency and efficiency into the entire supply chain.” 

To read the full report, including insight from Intelligent Assets, Intelligent Factories, Empowered People, and exclusive insight from Dominik Metzger, the lead on SAP’s Industry 4.0 programme, CLICK HERE.

Share article