Nov 4, 2020

Inside Trinidad and Tobago’s Supply Chain Landscape

InvesTT
Manufacturing
Supply Chain
Sean Galea-Pace
2 min
Inside Trinidad and Tobago’s Supply Chain Landscape
Manufacturing Global examines Trinidad and Tobago’s logistics/supply chain landscape...

Trinidad and Tobago’s geographical location at the southernmost end of the Caribbean islands positions it as a gateway to the Caribbean Community and North America. Its central location provides direct access to distribution markets in South, Central and North America. Commercial space is available in close proximity to international shipping ports that meet the needs for easy access to distribution points. Organizations can benefit from the ability to refine and streamline their supply chain offering. Setting up Third Party Logistics here will enable businesses to benefit from efficient access to goods and services, provide ready access to international markets, decreased costs in terms of inputs and transportation as well as cost-effective, quick delivery to customers locally and regionally.

Some of the key advantages include:

  • Location - The island is based at the southernmost point of the Caribbean archipelago with direct access to the Caribbean, Central and South America.
  • Upfront investment costs - Results in lower costs charged by vendors and result in tighter inventory controls and lower distribution costs.
  • Low electricity rates - Trinidad and Tobago has the lowest electricity rate in LAC.
  • Market access - As a CARICOM member, this will offer market access to 17mn with bilateral trade agreements providing businesses with access to an additional export market of around 984 million consumers.
  • Infrastructure - Trinidad and Tobago is renowned as the second most developed road network in the Caribbean and recognised as the third best for port capacity in the English-speaking Caribbean.

According to recent reports on the logistics industry, global market size is an anticipated US$1.1bn with a CAGR of 2.7% - 7% expected for the five-year period up to 2022. This growth in market size is attributed to the considerable growth in the e-commerce sector, fueled by increased penetration of high-speed internet and a rise in popularity towards online shopping. The reopening of borders worldwide is thought to see an increase in shipping and logistical activities.

Interested in learning more? Click here!

Share article

May 4, 2021

IHS Markit/CIPS: UK Manufacturing PMI near-record high

Supplychain
Manufacturing
IHSMarkit
CIPS
Georgia Wilson
3 min
Manufacturing UK | Smart Manufacturing | Industry Trends | Supply Chain | COVID-19 | IHS Markit | CIPS
Latest IHS Markit/CIPS UK Manufacturing PMI statistics report a near-record high in April, despite the sector continuing to face supply chain disruption...

Riding on the momentum of March 2021 which saw the fastest output growth since late-2020, IHS Markit/CIPS reports a further acceleration in the rate of expansion in the UK manufacturing sector for April 2021.

UK manufacturing trends

For the UK manufacturing sector, growth of output and new orders were both reported by IHS Markit and CIPS as among the best seen over the past seven years, which in turn has led to a strong increase in employment. Despite this, the sector continues to face supply chain delays and input shortages, which resulted in increased purchasing costs and record selling price inflation.

UK Manufacturing IHS Markit/CIPS Purchasing Managers’ Index® (PMI®)

Seasonally adjusted, IHS Markit/CIPS Purchasing Managers’ Index® (PMI®) rose to 60.9 in April, which was an increase compared to March (58.9) and above the estimated 60.7 for April. 

Increasing for the eleventh consecutive month, the latest readings are the highest since July 1994 (61.0). The output growth for April has been attributed to the loosening of lockdown restrictions, improving demands and a rise in backlogged work.

“The manufacturing sector was flooded with optimism in April as the PMI rose to its highest level since July 1994, bolstered by strong levels of new orders and the end of lockdown restrictions opened the gates to business. It was primarily the home market that fuelled this upsurge in activity though more work from the US, Europe and China demonstrated there were also improvements in the global economy. This boom largely benefited corporates as output growth at small-scale producers continued to lag behind,” said Duncan Brock, Group Director at the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply.

In addition to expanding production, total new orders rose for its third consecutive month, which was attributed to a revival of domestic market conditions, stronger client confidence, parts of the economy reopening and improving global market conditions.

While new exports rose in April, the rate was reported as weaker in comparison to new orders. “Companies reported improved new work intakes from several trading partners, including mainland Europe, the US, China and South-East Asia. Large-sized manufacturers saw a substantial expansion in new export order intakes, compared to only a marginal rise at small-sized firms,” said IHS Markit/CIPS.

UK Manufacturing’s outlook

Remaining positive at the start of the second quarter, 66% of companies forecast that output will be higher in a year's time, which is attributed to expectations for less disruption related to COVID-19 and Brexit, economic recovery, improved client confidence and new product launches.

“Further loosening of COVID-19 restrictions at home and abroad led to another marked growth spurt at UK factories. The headline PMI rose to a near 27-year high, as output and new orders expanded at increased rates. The outlook for the sector is also increasingly positive, with two-thirds of manufacturers expecting output to be higher in one year’s time. Export growth remains relatively subdued, however, as small manufacturers struggle to export,” said Rob Dobson, Director at IHS Markit.

Adding to comments from IHS Markit and CIPS, Sarah Banks, Managing Director of Freight and Logistics at Accenture Global said: “While today’s figures are positive overall, the worsening supply situation is still a concern, with rates of both input costs and selling price inflation running far above anything previously seen. Shipping delays and material shortages are driving huge backlogs of uncompleted work and the surge in manufacturing orders is leading to many firms struggling to boost operating capacity to keep up with demand. With business expectations becoming even more optimistic as the economy rebounds, the big question will be whether firms will be able to cope with the surging inflows of new orders.

“As ongoing supply chain issues are still at large, companies with wide international footprints should look to reassess their logistics strategies by running supply chain stress tests and simulations in order to respond quickly to upswings and variability in demand. A flexible and resilient supply chain will be a key way for businesses to remain both competitive and stable as we emerge from the pandemic” 

Share article