May 16, 2020

What 2017 will hold for MES in the food and beverage sector

food and drink
food industry
drink industry
Industry 4.0
Admin
4 min
 What 2017 will hold for MES in the food and beverage sector
Being a manufacturer is not easy these days. Margins continue to shrink, regulations are being tightened, and a considerable skills gap is taking hold...

Being a manufacturer is not easy these days. Margins continue to shrink, regulations are being tightened, and a considerable skills gap is taking hold.

One of the many challenges the industry faces is asking for better, more visible data – yet many manufacturers are still struggling to gather this information. There is a lack of visibility, a lack of usable metrics, and very little real-time information. And while Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems house some of the data, they lack the functionality to deliver information to the shop floor, which is necessary to address issues as they occur.

This is where a Manufacturing Execution System (MES) makes the difference. It tracks and documents the entire production process – from the raw material to the finished product. This data is then fed back into the production process.

The deployment of MES can help manufacturers to use capacities they were not even aware they had, and to better allocate resources – with great potential to become more efficient.

It pays to be picky

While 2017 is as good a time as any to get into MES, many forward-thinking food and beverage manufacturers did so years ago, and a growing number of them have now reached a point with their MES solution where they are asking for add-on features and functions that further capture production process data, and using it in a way that expands the footprint of the MES solution. Making the MES data a visible part of the overall supply chain is also crucial, and key to ensuring the four walls of the factory do not represent a black hole of information. Manufacturer wish lists are expanding.

Having proven itself as a very viable tool for improving efficiency in manufacturing, MES has reached a point where it is crucial not just that you deploy the system, but how.

For some manufacturers, deployment on their premises will work best, while others will receive greater benefits from a cloud-based solution. A combination of the two will be the way forward for many. Subscription-based models are prevalent now – making it possible for users to deploy MES quicker and with less effort.

Manufacturers have also started to ask for mobile features which allow the data that’s collected by the MES solution to be displayed on tablets and on other devices. This demand is also driving MES providers to advance app-based solutions.

It’s only data – unless you use it

Data collection is not the difficult part; organising the data in a way that makes it useful to manufacturers is. There are two phases. This first is selection: Which data can be used for which purpose? The second is intelligent presentation: How can this data be arranged so it has real value for those looking at it?  

MES solutions of the future will have to become better and better at getting the right kind of information, to the right person, at exactly the right time. There is no point in gathering huge amounts of data if people then have to go and dig for it. For MES solutions to be effective, what’s being recorded needs to automatically be turned into targeted actionable intelligence, facilitating improvement and a culture of action at all levels of the organisation.

Industry 4.0 is coming – prepare yourself

Smart manufacturing is more than just a buzzword now: as machines acquire more and more intelligence, the idea of a so-called Industry 4.0 is starting to become a reality. Scenarios where machines order their own parts according to their needs are not pipe dreams. In less than ten years’ time, something close to full automation might be possible.

But while some manufacturers stand prepared to embrace such a future, others – the broad majority, in fact – will take time to adjust. Advanced MES solutions will help them along the way.  Using the right kind of data in the right kind of way, manufacturers can make themselves more flexible, and more efficient – steadily progressing to what the manufacturing industry will look like in a decade.

The future is tailor-made

Over the coming years, MES is only likely to grow: the global market for the technology is projected to reach US$7.4 billion by 2020. With users who are already deploying MES solutions becoming more demanding – and with new users joining their ranks – 2017 looks set to be a year where MES takes another step towards providing the tailor-made, purpose-built solutions that will help food and beverage manufacturers to be as efficient as they need to be in order to stay successful, and continue their drive towards lowest cost producer status.

By James Wood, Aptean’s Director of Factory & Activplant Product Lines

 

Follow @ManufacturingGL and @NellWalkerMG 

Share article

May 12, 2021

Ultium Cells LLC/Li-Cycle: Sustainable Battery Manufacturing

SustainableManufacturing
BatteryCell
EVs
Automotive
2 min
Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

Ultium Cells LLC - a joint venture between General Motors and LG Energy Solutions - has announced its latest collaboration with Li-Cycle. Joining forces the two have set ambitions to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

 

What is Ultium Cells LLC?

Announcing their partnership in December 2019, General Motors (GM) and LG Energy Solutions established Ultium Cells LLC with a mission to “ensure excellence of Battery Cell Manufacturing through implementation of best practices from each company to contribute [to the] expansion of a Zero Emission propulsion on a global scale.”

Who is Li-Cycle?

Founded in 2016, Li-Cycle leverages innovative solutions to address emerging and urgent challenges around the world.

As the use of Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries in automotive, industrial energy storage, and consumer electronic applications rises, Li-Cycle believes that “the world needs improved technology and supply chain innovations to better recycle these batteries, while also meeting the rapidly growing demand for critical and scarce battery-grade materials.”

Why are Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces?

By joining forces to expand the recycling of scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing in North America, the new recycling process will allow Ultium Cells LLC to recycle cobalt, nickel, lithium, graphite, copper, manganese and aluminum.

“95% of these materials can be used in the production of new batteries or for adjacent industries,” says GM, who explains that the new hydrometallurgical process emits 30% less greenhouse gases (GHGs) than traditional processes, minimising the environmental impact. Use of this process will begin later in the year (2021).

"Our combined efforts with Ultium Cells will be instrumental in redirecting battery manufacturing scrap from landfills and returning a substantial amount of valuable battery-grade materials back into the battery supply chain. This partnership is a critical step forward in advancing our proven lithium-ion resource recovery technology as a more sustainable alternative to mining, " said Ajay Kochhar, President, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle.

"GM's zero-waste initiative aims to divert more than 90% of its manufacturing waste from landfills and incineration globally by 2025. Now, we're going to work closely with Ultium Cells and Li-Cycle to help the industry get even better use out of the materials,” added Ken Morris, Vice President of Electric and Autonomous Vehicles, GM.

Since 2013, GM has recycled or reused 100% of the battery packs it has received from customers, with most current GM EVs repaired with refurbished packs.

"We strive to make more with less waste and energy expended. This is a crucial step in improving the sustainability of our components and manufacturing processes,” concluded Thomas Gallagher, Chief Operating Officer, Ultium Cells LLC.

Image source: 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5

Share article