May 16, 2020

New survey shows businesses do not have a strong enough sales methodology

Manufacturing
sales
Business
Nell Walker
3 min
New survey shows businesses do not have a strong enough sales methodology
Some 70 percent of business decision-makers have admitted that their organisations salespeople do not have a systematic approach to engaging with custom...

Some 70 percent of business decision-makers have admitted that their organisation’s salespeople do not have a systematic approach to engaging with customers and prospects. Carried out for sales and negotiation experts Huthwaite International, the national YouGov research found that only 22 percent of British business decision makers said their organisation has a single sales methodology and eight percent do not know whether they did or not.

Tony Hughes, CEO at Huthwaite International, comments: “Considering most businesses have been set up in order to sell goods or services, it’s simply baffling that so few have a systematic approach to it. The fact that 71 percent of respondents in small companies (one-49 employees) say they don’t have a single sales methodology is perhaps understandable for a variety of reasons. But for the 67 percent in large companies (250+ employees) without a systematic approach there really is no excuse.

“Considering we’ve been a trading nation for hundreds of years, many companies still don’t appear to have a professional approach to selling. ‘Sales’ is not a dirty word and giving salespeople the tools to succeed can make a huge difference to the growth of the business. A sales methodology - and the skills that bring that methodology to life - allows customer-facing staff to build the value of the product or service with buyers, along with the value of their organisation itself,” says Hughes.

While no industry does particularly well in the survey, retail has the highest proportion of organisations with a common sales methodology, with 37 percent of respondents from this sector saying they have one. At the other end of the scale, a paltry 12 percent of respondents in construction say they have a systematic sales approach.

And manufacturing, with much talk of how it will increase trade to rebalance the UK economy, has just 16 percent of respondents saying they have a single, commonly used and understood sales methodology.

Hughes continues: “While manufacturing saw an upturn during the economic recovery, that now seems like a distant memory. If manufacturers are serious about growing their slice of the pie, they need to start thinking about selling in a different way. Talking benefits – as opposed to features – is enough of a challenge for most manufacturers, but even this is not far enough. They need a systematic approach to exploring, uncovering and developing their customers’ needs and a common language for presenting solutions and calibrating their progress in the sale.`

“Our previous research has shown that salespeople are not listening to their customers enough and are not asking the right questions. These are just two of the skills gaps that need to be addressed if a company wants to improve the performance of its sales force. It’s not just going to spontaneously get better, leaders need to take these skills seriously and invest in their employees’ development.”

 

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May 12, 2021

Ultium Cells LLC/Li-Cycle: Sustainable Battery Manufacturing

SustainableManufacturing
BatteryCell
EVs
Automotive
2 min
Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

Ultium Cells LLC - a joint venture between General Motors and LG Energy Solutions - has announced its latest collaboration with Li-Cycle. Joining forces the two have set ambitions to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

 

What is Ultium Cells LLC?

Announcing their partnership in December 2019, General Motors (GM) and LG Energy Solutions established Ultium Cells LLC with a mission to “ensure excellence of Battery Cell Manufacturing through implementation of best practices from each company to contribute [to the] expansion of a Zero Emission propulsion on a global scale.”

Who is Li-Cycle?

Founded in 2016, Li-Cycle leverages innovative solutions to address emerging and urgent challenges around the world.

As the use of Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries in automotive, industrial energy storage, and consumer electronic applications rises, Li-Cycle believes that “the world needs improved technology and supply chain innovations to better recycle these batteries, while also meeting the rapidly growing demand for critical and scarce battery-grade materials.”

Why are Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces?

By joining forces to expand the recycling of scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing in North America, the new recycling process will allow Ultium Cells LLC to recycle cobalt, nickel, lithium, graphite, copper, manganese and aluminum.

“95% of these materials can be used in the production of new batteries or for adjacent industries,” says GM, who explains that the new hydrometallurgical process emits 30% less greenhouse gases (GHGs) than traditional processes, minimising the environmental impact. Use of this process will begin later in the year (2021).

"Our combined efforts with Ultium Cells will be instrumental in redirecting battery manufacturing scrap from landfills and returning a substantial amount of valuable battery-grade materials back into the battery supply chain. This partnership is a critical step forward in advancing our proven lithium-ion resource recovery technology as a more sustainable alternative to mining, " said Ajay Kochhar, President, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle.

"GM's zero-waste initiative aims to divert more than 90% of its manufacturing waste from landfills and incineration globally by 2025. Now, we're going to work closely with Ultium Cells and Li-Cycle to help the industry get even better use out of the materials,” added Ken Morris, Vice President of Electric and Autonomous Vehicles, GM.

Since 2013, GM has recycled or reused 100% of the battery packs it has received from customers, with most current GM EVs repaired with refurbished packs.

"We strive to make more with less waste and energy expended. This is a crucial step in improving the sustainability of our components and manufacturing processes,” concluded Thomas Gallagher, Chief Operating Officer, Ultium Cells LLC.

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