May 16, 2020

Manufacturing and engineering sector leads the way in turning information into customer insight for business benefit

Iron Mountain
Manufacturing
Engineering
Business
Nell Walker
3 min
Manufacturing and engineering sector leads the way in turning information into customer insight for business benefit
Iron Mountain and PwC research shows companies in most sectors obtain little benefit from their information.

The manufacturing and engineering sector i...

Iron Mountain and PwC research shows companies in most sectors obtain little benefit from their information.

The manufacturing and engineering sector in Europe and North America is one of the few industries able to demonstrate a tangible link between employee access to valuable business information and measurable business benefits, according to a study by storage and information management company, Iron Mountain, and PwC.

The study found that just under half of European and North American companies either obtain little tangible benefit from their information (43 per cent) or no benefit whatsoever (23 per cent).  Despite the wider trend, the study revealed some areas of significant success. One of these is the way in which marketing teams in manufacturing and engineering companies are using valuable company information to enhance customer engagement and service.

On average just one in four companies (23 per cent) allow their marketing teams to access high-value company information – a figure that rises to one in three (30 per cent) in manufacturing and engineering. The sector also has greater confidence in marketing’s ability to make good use of this information. The outcomes suggest that this confidence is well-placed.

When asked whether they had experienced any benefits as a result of harnessing the value of their information, manufacturing and engineering firms were the most likely to point to improved customer retention (experienced by 80 per cent), the attraction of new customers (79 per cent), improved sales to existing customers (83 per cent) as well as a reduction in customer complaints (80 per cent). All these results are between four and six percentage points higher than the average.

Unsurprisingly, having had a taste of the advantages information can bring, marketing teams would like more. The manufacturing and engineering sector is, at 24 per cent, the most likely to say that the drive to manage information for competitive advantage comes from marketing.

“Businesses that make the most of their information can improve operations, open up new opportunities and help secure competitive advantage. Our research with PwC shows that, far from being traditionalist and product-focused, the manufacturing and engineering sector is leading the way in giving customer-facing professionals access to high-value information. As a consequence, companies in this sector are reaping benefits many other firms are missing out on,” said Elizabeth Bramwell, director at Iron Mountain.

Commenting on the research, Richard Petley from PwC says that information is among the most under-exploited assets in the commercial world: “Every transaction or interaction with customers and prospects is a potential source of valuable market intelligence and customer insight that can provide opportunity for innovation and improved customer service. The true benefit of this information comes from getting it into the hands of those employees with the right skills to interpret the insight and act upon it.”

The study questioned 1,800 senior business leaders, divided equally between Europe and North America, in mid-sized (over 250 employees) and enterprise-level organisations (over 2,500 employees).

A summary of the report, Seizing the information advantage: How organisations can unlock value and insight from the information they hold, can be found at www.ironmountain.co.uk/pwc.

 

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May 12, 2021

Ultium Cells LLC/Li-Cycle: Sustainable Battery Manufacturing

SustainableManufacturing
BatteryCell
EVs
Automotive
2 min
Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

Ultium Cells LLC - a joint venture between General Motors and LG Energy Solutions - has announced its latest collaboration with Li-Cycle. Joining forces the two have set ambitions to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

 

What is Ultium Cells LLC?

Announcing their partnership in December 2019, General Motors (GM) and LG Energy Solutions established Ultium Cells LLC with a mission to “ensure excellence of Battery Cell Manufacturing through implementation of best practices from each company to contribute [to the] expansion of a Zero Emission propulsion on a global scale.”

Who is Li-Cycle?

Founded in 2016, Li-Cycle leverages innovative solutions to address emerging and urgent challenges around the world.

As the use of Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries in automotive, industrial energy storage, and consumer electronic applications rises, Li-Cycle believes that “the world needs improved technology and supply chain innovations to better recycle these batteries, while also meeting the rapidly growing demand for critical and scarce battery-grade materials.”

Why are Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces?

By joining forces to expand the recycling of scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing in North America, the new recycling process will allow Ultium Cells LLC to recycle cobalt, nickel, lithium, graphite, copper, manganese and aluminum.

“95% of these materials can be used in the production of new batteries or for adjacent industries,” says GM, who explains that the new hydrometallurgical process emits 30% less greenhouse gases (GHGs) than traditional processes, minimising the environmental impact. Use of this process will begin later in the year (2021).

"Our combined efforts with Ultium Cells will be instrumental in redirecting battery manufacturing scrap from landfills and returning a substantial amount of valuable battery-grade materials back into the battery supply chain. This partnership is a critical step forward in advancing our proven lithium-ion resource recovery technology as a more sustainable alternative to mining, " said Ajay Kochhar, President, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle.

"GM's zero-waste initiative aims to divert more than 90% of its manufacturing waste from landfills and incineration globally by 2025. Now, we're going to work closely with Ultium Cells and Li-Cycle to help the industry get even better use out of the materials,” added Ken Morris, Vice President of Electric and Autonomous Vehicles, GM.

Since 2013, GM has recycled or reused 100% of the battery packs it has received from customers, with most current GM EVs repaired with refurbished packs.

"We strive to make more with less waste and energy expended. This is a crucial step in improving the sustainability of our components and manufacturing processes,” concluded Thomas Gallagher, Chief Operating Officer, Ultium Cells LLC.

Image source: 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5

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