May 16, 2020

Biggest manufacturers in Europe

Volkswagen
Daimler
Exor
BASF
Nell Walker
2 min
Biggest manufacturers in Europe
Dominated by Germany, Europes most profitable manufacturers earn billions every year thanks to the production of their top-of-the-range quality products...

Dominated by Germany, Europe’s most profitable manufacturers earn billions every year thanks to the production of their top-of-the-range quality products.

 

Here are the top seven biggest European manufacturers:

Volkswagen (Germany) - $254 billion

Despite various recent troubles, Volkswagen remains the biggest manufacturer in Europe, as well as being the largest automaker worldwide. It has been operating since 1937 and many of its cars have earned iconic status, namely the Beetle, the Type 2 (known colloquially as a ‘VW camper’), and the Golf.

Daimler (Germany) - $158.8 billion

Another automotive manufacturer, Daimler began in 1926 as Daimler-Benz, later becoming DaimlerChrysler before settling on simply ‘Daimler’ in 2007. It deals in various brands including Mercedes-Benz cars and vans, Daimler trucks and buses, engines for Formula 1 racing, and other components.

Exor (Italy) - $141.5 billion

Founded in 1927, Exor is an investment agency. It holds shareholdings of some of the biggest companies in the world, including Juventus FC, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ferrari, and Welltec.

BASF (Germany) - $103.9 billion

The largest chemical producer in the world was founded in 1865, which comprises many subsidiaries and joint ventures, allowing it to become a huge global force. It operates in over 80 countries and employs 112,000 people worldwide. The company receives little media attention due to the abandonment of its consumer product lines over 20 years ago, but it remains enormously profitable.

Nestlé (Switzerland) - $100.6 billion

The largest food company in the world (by revenue) was founded in 1866 as Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company. Known best for its confectionary, Nestlé also makes baby food, tea, pet food, coffee, and cereals.

Siemens (Germany) - $100.6 billion

Siemens began in 1847 with the production of a telegraph-like device which used a needle to point to a letter sequence, with the aim to create something simpler than the Morse code. Now it is best known for making great technological strides in the realm of industrial devices and electronics.

BMW (Germany) - $98.8 billion

Another car company, BMW was founded in 1916 and is best known for its luxury car lines. It has also done a lot of work within the Formula 1 and bicycle sectors, and ensures a stronghold on the industry with subsidiaries all over the world.

 

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May 12, 2021

Ultium Cells LLC/Li-Cycle: Sustainable Battery Manufacturing

SustainableManufacturing
BatteryCell
EVs
Automotive
2 min
Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

Ultium Cells LLC - a joint venture between General Motors and LG Energy Solutions - has announced its latest collaboration with Li-Cycle. Joining forces the two have set ambitions to expand recycling in North America, recycling up to 100% of the scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing

 

What is Ultium Cells LLC?

Announcing their partnership in December 2019, General Motors (GM) and LG Energy Solutions established Ultium Cells LLC with a mission to “ensure excellence of Battery Cell Manufacturing through implementation of best practices from each company to contribute [to the] expansion of a Zero Emission propulsion on a global scale.”

Who is Li-Cycle?

Founded in 2016, Li-Cycle leverages innovative solutions to address emerging and urgent challenges around the world.

As the use of Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries in automotive, industrial energy storage, and consumer electronic applications rises, Li-Cycle believes that “the world needs improved technology and supply chain innovations to better recycle these batteries, while also meeting the rapidly growing demand for critical and scarce battery-grade materials.”

Why are Ultium Cells LLC and Li-Cycle join forces?

By joining forces to expand the recycling of scrap materials in battery cell manufacturing in North America, the new recycling process will allow Ultium Cells LLC to recycle cobalt, nickel, lithium, graphite, copper, manganese and aluminum.

“95% of these materials can be used in the production of new batteries or for adjacent industries,” says GM, who explains that the new hydrometallurgical process emits 30% less greenhouse gases (GHGs) than traditional processes, minimising the environmental impact. Use of this process will begin later in the year (2021).

"Our combined efforts with Ultium Cells will be instrumental in redirecting battery manufacturing scrap from landfills and returning a substantial amount of valuable battery-grade materials back into the battery supply chain. This partnership is a critical step forward in advancing our proven lithium-ion resource recovery technology as a more sustainable alternative to mining, " said Ajay Kochhar, President, CEO and co-founder of Li-Cycle.

"GM's zero-waste initiative aims to divert more than 90% of its manufacturing waste from landfills and incineration globally by 2025. Now, we're going to work closely with Ultium Cells and Li-Cycle to help the industry get even better use out of the materials,” added Ken Morris, Vice President of Electric and Autonomous Vehicles, GM.

Since 2013, GM has recycled or reused 100% of the battery packs it has received from customers, with most current GM EVs repaired with refurbished packs.

"We strive to make more with less waste and energy expended. This is a crucial step in improving the sustainability of our components and manufacturing processes,” concluded Thomas Gallagher, Chief Operating Officer, Ultium Cells LLC.

Image source: 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5

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